Fruits and vegetables’ latest superpower? Lowering blood pressure

Eating potassium-rich foods like sweet potatoes, avocados, spinach, beans, bananas — and even coffee — could be key to lowering blood pressure, according to Alicia McDonough, PhD, professor of cell and neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. “Decreasing sodium intake is a well-established way to lower blood pressure,” McDonough said, “but evidence ... Read More »

April 5th, 2017|Announcements, Keck Net Intranet|

Primary care students focus on health education, community outreach

First-year medical students from the Keck School of Medicine of USC Primary Care Program partnered with the Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center's Wellness Center recently to hold the first annual Diabetes Day. Twenty-four participating medical students taught diabetic nutrition to Wellness Center patients by leading nutrition sessions in both English and Spanish. These ... Read More »

April 4th, 2017|Announcements, Keck Net Intranet|

From mother to baby: ‘Secondhand sugars’ can pass through breast milk

Add breast milk to the list of foods and beverages that contain fructose, a sweetener linked to health issues ranging from obesity to diabetes. A new study by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC indicates that a sugar called fructose is passed from mother to infant through breast milk. The proof-of-concept study ... Read More »

April 4th, 2017|Announcements, Keck Net Intranet|

Urologist answers nine questions about urine

René Sotelo, MD, professor of clinical urology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, is known as a leader in the use of robotic surgery to treat urologic cancers and benign conditions. But he’s also an expert in more everyday matters. He recently answered a few questions about urine, dispelling myths and addressing common ... Read More »

April 4th, 2017|Announcements, Keck Net Intranet|

Air pollution linked to heightened risk of Type 2 diabetes in obese Latino children

Latino children who live in areas with higher levels of air pollution have a heightened risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new USC-led study. Scientists tracked children’s health and respective levels of residential air pollution for about 3½ years before associating chronic unhealthy air exposure to a breakdown in beta cells, special ... Read More »

April 4th, 2017|Announcements, Keck Net Intranet|